Why We Still Celebrate Pride Month Fifty-One Years After the Stonewall Riots

Note: This piece was first published on June 28, 2020 on the Channel 27 News & Entertainment, Grant County’s website. June 28, 2020 by Chaylee N. Brock I am bisexual and genderqueer, but to keep it simple, I use the all-encompassing word “queer” to identify myself. Getting to the point where I could “come out” … Continue reading Why We Still Celebrate Pride Month Fifty-One Years After the Stonewall Riots

The History of Juneteenth and Why It Should Be Celebrated Today

Note: This piece was first published on June 7, 2020 on the Channel 27 News & Entertainment, Grant County’s website. June 7, 2020 by Chaylee N. Brock Most people are familiar with the Emancipation Proclamation, signed into law by President Lincoln in 1863, which was meant to set American slaves free. However, the executive order … Continue reading The History of Juneteenth and Why It Should Be Celebrated Today

Congress Working on Bill to Bring Financial Relief During Coronavirus Pandemic

Early Saturday morning, the House of Representatives passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which now heads to the Senate on Monday to face deliberation and votes. The bill “provides paid leave, establishes free testing, protects public health workers, and provides important benefits to children and families,” all of which is now needed, given that businesses and schools are shuttering their doors in response to the global coronavirus pandemic.

Are School Choice Laws Causing Racial Segregation In Our Local Schools?

We were recently made aware of and directed toward Department of Education data regarding the number of children enrolled in Marion Community Schools, and, more specifically, the number of students who live within the MCS district but choose to enroll in other, outside schools. The DOE data for Marion Schools is fascinating to consider. It seems to show that enrollment numbers and demographics within the student population have been changing and becoming more diverse over the last ten years, but what’s behind these changes?

Marching on Washington and Fighting for Racial Equality: from 1963 to 2020

On August 28, 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stood in front of the Lincoln Memorial and gave his famous “I have a dream” speech. Approximately 250,000 people descended upon Washington, D.C. on that day to listen to Dr. King and many other Civil Rights advocates, including the late John Lewis, speak to their dreams of and work towards a fairer, more just, more inclusive United States. On August 28, 2020, 57 years after Dr. King gave his famous speech, thousands more gathered in Washington, D.C. yet again, protesting and calling for a lot of the same things Civil Rights advocates were marching for in 1963.

State Representative Ann Vermilion Sends Mixed Messages Regarding Colleague’s Racist Posts

While it seems Vermilion was trying to condemn Lucas’ Facebook post and its blatant racism, many of Vermilion’s own constituents weren’t buying it. Many accused her of being vague and unwilling to take a strong stance against his racist behavior.

Why Everyone Needs to Take the Coronavirus Seriously

Note: This editorial was first published on March 13, 2020 on the Channel 27 News & Entertainment, Grant County's website. March 13, 2020 by Chaylee N. Brock I try not to talk about it often, especially with strangers, but I feel like this is important to say right about now: I have an autoimmune disease. … Continue reading Why Everyone Needs to Take the Coronavirus Seriously